National Poverty Plan

The NDP have a national anti-poverty strategy created in broad consultation with anti-poverty groups. The strategy involves strengthening of National Child Benefit Supplement as well as the Working Income Tax Benefit. They have also pledged to work towards a $15 federal minimum wage.

Grade:

 

Economic well-being is a key contributor to health outcomes, and a healthy workforce is the foundation of a healthy economy. To address income inequality and poverty, the CFPC advocates a federal anti-poverty strategy. Currently, no national poverty program exists.

Grade:
 
 
The Liberal Party is committed to addressing the issue of poverty. Existing announcements include a Canadian Child Benefit, a return to the age of 65 for Old Age Security as well as expansion of Nutrition North to ensure affordable nutrition.

Grade:

 

The Green Party platform suggests implementing the Guaranteed Liveable Income initiative to ensure Canadians can live healthy lives, regardless of socioeconomic status.

Grade:
 

National Homelessness Plan

The NDP has pledged to renew the federal housing arrangements as well as introduce incentives for new rental housing.

Grade:

 

The federal government established the Homelessness Partnering Strategy in 1999. The 2013/14 federal budget allocated funds for affordable housing through a “housing first” approach, however the results of this program have been slow to materialize.

Grade:
 
 
The Liberal party pledged $20-billion in social infrastructure over ten years. Their proposed investments include dedicated support for senior’s facilities, help build more housing units and refurbish existing ones, renew current co-operative agreements, and provide operational funding support for municipalities, including renewing support for Housing First initiatives that help homeless Canadians find stable housing.

Grade:

 

The Green Party platform recommends the implementation of a National Affordable Housing Program that incentivises the creation of affordable housing to help reduce homelessness.

Grade:
 

Aboriginal Health Programs

The NDP offers a comprehensive approach to achieve improvements of Aboriginal Health. The approach includes consultation with a range of Indigenous groups to create a food strategy as well a clean water strategy. Their leadership on establishing a child-first Jordan’s Principle as well as work on suicide prevention strategy are just some of the examples of their strong performance in this area.

Grade:

 

The Conservatives will invest in mental wellness teams in First Nations Communities as well as into Aboriginal health research to improve and promote the health of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada. However, CFPC is concerned with the withdrawal of money from Aboriginal organizations that provided vital supports and data to Aboriginal health.

Grade:
 
 
The Liberal Party offers several initiatives to help Aboriginal communities, including a $2.6 billion investment into education, a support for the 2005 Kelowna Accord as well as a new and improved fiscal relationship. These beneficial programs will have a tangential positive impact on the health of Canada’s indigenous people.

Grade:

 

The Green Party has committed to ensuring that the recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Report are implemented. Their platform includes recognizing and implementing the health care rights of Aboriginal people as identified in international law, constitutional law, and under the Treaties.

Grade:
 

National Mental Health and Addiction Strategy

The NDP has positioned veterans’ mental health as a crucial issue in debates and has advocated for a suicide prevention strategy for aboriginal youth. Bill C-386 called for a National Dementia Strategy. . The NDP announced $40-million for a national strategy on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia over the next four years to help support screening for early diagnosis, increase funding for research, and develop guidelines for the dignified care of patients with dementia. The NDP’s approach to addiction strategy emphasizes evidence-based harm reduction and prevention strategies.

Grade:

 

The Conservatives will renew the mandate of the Mental Health Commission of Canada for another 10 years, beginning in 2017–18. The government will also be providing funding starting in 2015-16, to help improve seniors' health by establishing the Canadian Centre for Aging and Brain Health Innovation. However, the CFPC is concerned that the National Anti-Drug Strategy, in concert with recently passed laws, favours enforcement over prevention, treatment, and harm reduction.

Grade:
 
 
The Liberal Party plans to implement an integrated approach to ensuring access to acute services, tertiary care referrals, housing, primary care, and community and multidisciplinary team management plans. The party’s approach to addiction emphasizes harm reduction, public health and negation of harmful societal effects such as crime via support of supervised injection sites. New centres of excellence specializing in mental health, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and related issues for veterans and first responders will also be created. A pan-Canadian Expert Advisory Council on Mental Health will be established to advise on the implementation of the Mental Health Commission of Canada’s recommendations.

Grade:

 

The Green Party's platform supports the Mental Health Commission of Canada's mandate and calls for its extension. They also advocate for increasing funding transfers for non-institutionalized mental health patients to ensure a comprehensive, robust mental health strategy for all Canadians. Not enough information is provided regarding their approach to addressing addiction.

Grade:
 

Child and Youth Strategy

The NDP has several initiatives aiming to assist families with children, including affordable child care options, enhancement of National Child Care Benefit, and the youth mental health strategy. The party announced it will establish a $100-million mental-health innovation fund for children and youth. There is an absence of suggestions on tackling the rising issues of childhood obesity and other factors outside of those directly described.

Grade:

 

There is currently no federal strategy on child and youth health issues such as mental health and obesity. Canada’s investment in early childhood development is one of the lowest among OECD countries. The Conservatives have expanded the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) to aid families with children under 17. However, Canada would benefit from a national child and youth strategy and an early childhood education program and CFPC urges the federal government to take action. Targeted action against obesity is also needed.

Grade:
 
 
There are currently several planned investments into child well-being in the Liberal platform, including the Canadian Child Benefit, support of immunization and investment into early childhood education for Aboriginal Communities. The Liberal platform has also specifically committed to a policy of restricting marketing of junk foods, better regulation of trans fats and salt additives, and improved nutritional labelling as part of a healthy food choices campaign. The platform commits dedicated funding of $15 per year over the next two years to the Public Health Agency of Canada to develop a strategy to increase vaccination rates in children, and to improve concussion treatments. The Liberal platform also commits to introducing plain packaging regulations for tobacco.

Grade:

 

The Green Party supports increased funding for child and youth health. Their platform initiatives include youth mental health strategies, the elimination of marketing unhealthy foods, and making strategic investments to aggressively address inactivity and obesity.

Grade: